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Course registration

If you want to join an elective course please send your registration by e-mail to econgrad<at>uni-mannheim.de within the registration period from January 9 until February 1, 2017.


Information for exchange students, MMM students and Business Mathematics students: Please note that you can choose freely from our elective courses as long as you fulfill the prerequisites mentioned there. (In case of doubt, please contact the lecturers for more information about the prerequisites and to discuss if you fulfill them.) Core courses are not open for exchange students and students from other programs.

Elective courses

Lectures

E505 Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies

E508 Multiple Time Series Analysis

E557 Public Economics

E581 International Trade

E589 Financial Contracting

E590 Methods in Empirical Microeconomics

E5014 Microeconometric Methods: Duration, Count Data, and Censored Regression Analysis

E5015 Monetary Economics

E5030 Behavioral Economics: Theory and Experimental Methods

E5031 Applied Labour Economics

Seminars

E530 Topics in Industrial Organization

E574 Internet Economics

E576 Economic Modeling - Historical and Methodological Perspectives

E577 Income and Wealth Inequality

E586 Evaluation of Labor, Development, Education and Health Programs and Policies

E598 Financial Time Series

E5005 Seminar in Public Economics - Spring 2017: Tax and Investment Policies in Open Economies

E5006 Topics in Empirical Industrial Organization

E5016 Topics in International Finance

E5020 Topics in Empirical Microeconomics

E5028 Topics on Monetary Union

E5029 Behavioral Finance

E5032 Competition Policy

 

E505 Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies (lecture + exercise)


Prof. Dr. Martin Peitz

ECTS-Credits: 14
Teaching method: Lecture (4 SWS) + exercise (2 SWS)
Workload:280 hours in total; 62 hours of teaching and 218 hours for independent studies and exam preparation
Expected number of students in class: 45 in lecture and 45 in exercise sessions
Prerequisites: E601, E602, E603 or equivalent

Goals and contents of the module: This course covers the theory of industrial organization. It provides an overview of modern industrial organization with an emphasis of the theory and formal models. Models are adapted to tackle concrete problems. Students are provided with a toolkit and are encouraged to think strategically. Theoretical analyses are complemented by case studies and background knowledge of competition policy. Organization: 1. Introduction; 2. Market Power; 3. Sources of Market Power; 4. Pricing and Market Segmentation; 5. Product Quality and Information; 6. Theory of Competition Policy; 7. R&D and Intellectual Property; 8. Networks, Standards, and Systems; 9. Intermediation

Expected competences acquired after completion of the module: This course enables the student to gain an understanding of strategic planning problems from a business strategy and competition policy perspective. Importantly, the student will not only become acquainted with existing models but also with more general principles and mechanisms at work. The student will be able to solve formal models and apply them to different market environments. The student will improve his or her modelling skills and in particular is enabled to apply game and contract theory to market environments. Apart from improving his or her analytical skills the student will learn to synthesise his or her knowledge. He or she will learn to interpret their results obtained through formal analysis. He or she will be able to formulate the caveats of the analyses and to obtain policy conclusions from the analysis. Through weekly exercise sessions and discussion in class the student’s communication skills are improved. Since most of the weekly take home exercises are to be done in small groups of students the course also fosters the social skills of students.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-credits and grades: Exam (60 %), two sets of graded take home exercises (20 %), participation in class (lecture and exercise sessions) (20 %)

Further information Essential reading: Paul Belleflamme and Martin Peitz (2015), Industrial Organization: Markets and Strategies, 2nd edition, Cambridge University Press.

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Monday, 13:45 to 17:00 in P 044 Seminarraum, L 7, 3-5
Start: 13.02.2017, End: 29.05.2017

Exercise:
Wednesday, 12:00 to 13:30 in P 044 Seminarraum, L 7, 3-5
Start: 22.02.2017, End: 31.05.2017

E508 Multiple Time Series Analysis (lecture + exercise)


Prof. Dr. Carsten Trenkler

ECTS-Credits: 9.5
Prerequisites: Master in Economics: E 601-E 603 (E700-E703 until autumn term 2012) or equivalent courses for exchange students; Master in Business Economics: none.

Goals and Contents of the module: The lecture gives an introduction to multiple time series techniques and will cover vector autoregressive (VAR) processes, VAR estimation, VAR order selection and model checking. If time permits, we will also cover VARMA, Structural VAR models and so-called VEC models. The use of VAR models in forecasting, causality and impulse response analysis will be explained and illustrated using empirical examples and by discussing a selected set of research papers. The methods will be applied in computer tutorials.

Contact person: Carsten Trenkler, Tel. 181-1851, E-mail: trenkler<at>uni-mannheim.de, L7, 3-5, room 105

Recommended Textbook:
Lütkepohl, H. (2005), New Introduction to Multiple Time Series Analysis, Springer, Berlin, Chapters 1-4, 6-9, and 11-13, Appendices A-D. The list of covered research papers will be provided at the beginning of the course.

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Monday, 17:15 to 18:45 in P 044 Seminarraum, L 7, 3-5
Start: 13.02.2017, End: 29.05.2017

Exercise:
Wednesday, 10:15 to 11:45 in 158 Poolraum in L 7, 3-5 (on the following dates: 15.02., 29.03., 06.04., 10.05., and 24.05.) / P 044 Seminarraum, L 7, 3-5 (on all dates when the exercise will not take place in the PC Pool)
Start: 15.02.2017, End: 31.05.2017

E557 Public Economics (lecture)


Valerio Dotti

ECTS-Credits: 5
Workload: 150 working hours, containing 24 hours class time and 126 hours independent study time and preparation for the exam
Expected number of students in class: 8-10
Prerequisites: E601-E602-E603 or equivalent

Goals and Contents of the module: This course focuses on the state’s role in correcting market failures and on the optimal use of taxes. We will take a normative perspective, i.e., we ask what an ideal state would do in order to achieve distributive objectives. It will be composed by two parts. The first part will deal with market failures and public intervention. The second part will be devoted to tax theory.
Part I: Market failures and public intervention
1. Introduction: the public sector in a mixed economy
2. Efficient allocations and market equilibrium
3. Why and when the government should intervene in the economy
4. Public Goods
5. Externalities

Part II: Tax theory
1. Introduction to Taxation
2. Optimal commodity taxation
3. Many Person Ramsey Tax Rule
4. Non-linear taxation of income
5. Commodity taxation when non-linear income taxation is possible

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: The course introduces the core topics in Public Economics. The course should prove useful for any student interested in analyzing policy issues.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: One written exam, 90 minutes.

Useful references are:
Atkinson and Stiglitz, Lectures on Public Economics, Mc Graw-Hill, 1980
Rosen, Public Finance, 3rd Edition, 1992, Irwin, Boston.
Salanié: Microeconomics of market failures
Cornes and Sandler: The theory of externalities, public goods and club goods
Salanie, The economics of taxation, MIT Press, 2003
Myles, Public Economics, Cambridge University Press, 1995
Mas-Collel, Whinston, Green, Microeconomic Theory, Harvard University Press 1996
Stiglitz, “Economics of the Public sector”, 3rd Edition, 2000, Norton & Company.
Hindriks and Myles, “Intermediate Public Economics”, MIT Press.

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Thursday, 17:15 to 18:45 in 002 Seminarraum, L 9, 1-2
Start: 16.02.2017, End: 01.06.2017, will not take place on 23.02.2017

Non-regular sessions:
Tuesday, 28.02.2017, 17:15 to 18:45 in lecture hall 001, L9, 1-2

E581 International Trade (lecture + exercise)


Yanping Liu/ Harald Fadinger

ECTS-Credits: 7
Teaching method: lecture and exercise, together: 3
Workload:
Expected number of students in class: 20
Prerequisites: E601-603 for all Master’s elective courses

Goals and Contents of the module: This course will focus on the determinants, patterns and effects of International trade. It will cover the core trade models as well as their empirical applications. A tentative list of topics includes: Ricardian model, Heckscher-Ohlin model, trade with monopolistic competition, gravity equation, openness and firm productivity, trade and innovation, the interrelation between trade and income distribution, and other closely related topics. It will place equal weights on the trade theory and empirics of international trade.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Familiarity with modern international trade theory and empirical method in International Trade.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Final exam, presentations.

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Tuesday, 09:15 to 11:45 in 002 Seminarraum, L 9, 1-2
Start: 14.02.2017, End: 28.03.2017

Exercise:
Thursday, 13:45 to 16:15 in 002 Seminarraum, L 9, 1-2
Start: 16.02.2017, End: 30.03.2017

E589 Financial Contracting (lecture + exercise)


Prof. Emanuele Tarantino, Ph.D.

ECTS-Credits: 9
Teaching method: Lecture (2 SWS) and Exercise (2 SWS)
Workload:
Expected number of students in class: 35
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent)

Goals and Contents of the module: The aim of this course is to show how financing decisions are affected by moral hazard and asymmetric information, and how securities’ design can mitigate agency costs. The course will review the theoretical and empirical literature on financial contracting.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Ability to write an academic essay, read empirical papers, understand corporate financing decisions.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: written final exam

Reference book: Tirole (2006), The Theory of Corporate Finance, Princeton University Press.

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Tuesday, 15:30 to 17:00 in 001 Hörsaal, L 7, 3-5
Start: 14.02.2017, End: 30.05.2017

Exercise:
Wednesday, 13:45 to 15:15 in 001 Hörsaal, L 7, 3-5
Start: 15.02.2017, End: 31.05.2017

E590 Methods in Empirical Microeconomics


Hidenori Takahashi

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: Lecture (2 SWS)
Workload: 180 working hours, containing 42 hours class time and 138 hours independent study time and preparation for the exam
Expected number of students in class: expect between 5 and 30 students
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent)

Goals and Contents of the module: The course introduces empirical methods widely used in applied micro research, which includes but not limited to limited dependent variable models, difference-in-differences, regression discontinuity, and multilevel models. We will also discuss some recent empirical papers which have adopted these methods to address important economic questions. Also, we replicate some of the results obtained in published work in exercise session.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: After completion of the module, students should be able to interpret and discuss limitations of empirical work in microeconomics.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: one written final exam (100%)

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Monday, 08:30 to 10:00 in O148 MVV Hörsaal, Palace East Wing
Start: 13.02.2017, End: 29.05.2017

E5014 Microeconometric Methods: Duration, Count Data, and Censored Regression Analysis (lecture + exercise)


Daniel Gutknecht, Ph.D.

ECTS-Credits: 9
Teaching method: Lecture (2 SWS) + Exercise (2 SWS)
Expected number of students in class: 10-20
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent)

Goals and Contents of the module: The analysis of different non-standard data types has a long history in applied and theoretical Microeconometrics. This course will provide an introduction to the analysis of duration, count, and “censored regression” data focusing in particular on identification, estimation, and implementation related issues. The first part of the course will mainly deal with different duration models, sampling schemes, censoring, unobserved heterogeneity, and treatment analysis in the duration context. The second part of the course will focus on count data and censored regression (e.g., Tobit) models dealing also with topics such as sample selection, truncation, etc..

Expected competences acquired after completion of the module: By the end of the course, students (i) should have a solid understanding of the key concepts of duration, count data, censored regression analysis and of related topics, (ii) should have acquired the mathematical tools, the empirical skills, and the necessary vocabulary to understand and to analyze theoretical and empirical questions in this context, and (iii) should be able to provide scientifically sound solutions and answers to these questions.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-credits and grades: Written exam (90min) (85%) + coursework including short presentation (15%)

Literature: Cameron and Trivedi (2005): “Microeconometrics – Methods and Applications”; Chs. 16-20. Wooldridge (2010): “Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data”; Chs. 17-20,22. Lancaster (1990): “The Econometric Analysis of Transition Data”. Winkelmann (2008): “The Econometric Analysis of Count Data”. Various Research Papers (specified in class).

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Monday, 10:15 to 11:45 in 002 Seminarraum, L9, 1-2
Start: 13.02.2017, End: 29.05.2017

Exercise:
Thursday, 10:15 to 11:45 in 002 Seminarraum, L9, 1-2
Start: 02.03.2017, End: 01.06.2017

Non-regular sessions:
Thursday, 09.03.2017, 10:15 to 13:30 in 158 Poolraum, L7, 3-5
Thursday, 27.04.2017, 10:15 to 13:30 in 158 Poolraum, L7, 3-5

E5015 Monetary Economics (lecture + exercise)


Dmitry Matveev

ECTS-Credits: 9
Teaching method: Lecture (2 SWS) and Exercise (2 SWS)
Workload:
Expected number of students in class: 10-20
Prerequisites: E601-E603 (or equivalent)

Goals and Contents of the module: This course will focus on the monetary aspects of the business cycle and their implications for monetary policy. In particular we will use small scale New Keynesian models to analyze the interplay of nominal and real variables along the cycle. These models integrate Keynesian elements (imperfect competition and nominal rigidities) into the dynamic stochastic general equilibrium framework that has been widely used in the Real Business Cycle literature. Two of the main lessons delivered by the NK approach need to be stressed: departures from perfect competition and the presence of nominal rigidities are key to break the classical dichotomy; the economy’s response to shocks is not necessarily efficient. As an implication, there is room for a welfare enhancing intervention of the monetary authority in order to minimize efficiency losses along the cycle. In this context, RBC theory becomes a normative benchmark defining the constrained efficient allocation as the monetary policy target.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Ability to operate and conduct analysis within a modern framework of monetary macroeconomic models.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Problem sets (30%) + Written exam (70%).

Further information:
The material discussed in class will be accompanied by lecture notes and relevant references. Homework assignments may require writing computer codes. The programming environment of the course is Matlab. Programming may be done in groups of two students, but the homework must be submitted individually.
The textbook of the course is Galí, J. “Monetary Policy, Inflation and the Business Cycle: An Introduction to the New Keynesian Framework”, Princeton University Press (Second Edition, 2015)
Other useful textbooks
Woodford, M. “Interest and Prices: Foundations of a Theory of Monetary Policy”, Princeton University Press (2003)
Walsh, C. “Monetary Theory and Policy”, The MIT Press (Third Edition, 2010).

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Wednesday, 15:30 to 17:00 in 003 Seminarraum, L 9, 1-2
Start: 22.02.2017, End: 31.05.2017

Exercise:
Wednesday, 17:15 to 18:45 in 158 Poolraum, L 7, 3-5
Start: 22.02.2017, End: 31.05.2017

Non-regular sessions:
Friday, 24.02.2017, 13:45 to 15:15 in 001, L 7, 3-5
Friday, 24.02.2017, 15:30 to 17:00 in 158 Poolraum, L 7, 3-5

E5030 Behavioral Economics: Theory and Experimental Methods (lecture + exercise)


Prof. Dr. Holger Rau

ECTS-Credits: 9
Teaching method: Lecture (2 SWS) + exercise (2 SWS)
Workload: 270 working hours, containing 42 hours class time and 228 hours independent study time and preparation for the exam
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent) for all Master’s elective courses, prerequisites in Micro Economics and Game Theory are mandatory.

Goals and Contents of the module: This module is divided into two parts. The first part deals about behavioral-economic theory, demonstrating how it extends the standard micro-economic theory. Here, students are presented to classical choice anomalies. In this context the lecture concentrates on decision under uncertainty. The students will get a profound understanding how Kahneman and Tversky’s (1979) Prospect Theory may serve as alternative theory for decision under uncertainty. The module will also demonstrate how fairness issues may affect decision making. Here it covers the inequality-aversion model by Fehr and Schmidt (1999).
In the second part students will get a precise understanding about the usage and appropriate design of economic experiments.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Students will acquire a basic understanding of behavioral-economic theory. Importantly, they will acquire the knowledge to set up experiments based on existing research questions.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Written exam.

Further information: Ackert, L., and Deaves, R. (2009). Behavioral finance: Psychology, decision-making, and markets. Cengage Learning.
Angnar, E. (2012). A course in behavioral economics. Palgrave-McMillian.
Camerer, C., Loewenstein, G., Rabin, M. (2004). Advances in Behavioral Economics. Princeton University Press.
Davis, D. and Holt, C. (1992). Experimental Economics. Princeton University Press.
Friedman, D. and Sunder, S. (1994). Experimental Methods: A Primer for Economists. Cambridge Universtiy Pres.
Moffatt, P.G. (2015). Experimetrics – Econometrics for Experimental Economics.
Smith, V. & Plott, C. (2008): Handbook of Experimental Economic Results. North Holland.
Wilkinson, N. & Klaes, M. (2012). An introduction to behavioral economics. Palgrave-McMillian.

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Tuesday, 12:00 to 13:30 in A001, L 15, 1-6
Start: 14.02.2017, End: 30.05.2017

Exercise:
Tuesday, 13:45 to 15:15 in A001, L 15, 1-6
Start: 14.02.2017, End: 30.05.2017

E5031 Applied Labour Economics (lecture + exercise)


Dr. Asmus Zoch

ECTS-Credits: 7
Teaching method: Lecture (2 SWS) + exercise (1 SWS)
Workload: 137 hours in total; 31 hours of teaching and 106 hours for independent studies, project and exam preparation
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent)

Goals and Contents of the module: This course will focus on different micro-econometric models using actual empirical studies from the field of labour economics. Starting from the standard theory of competitive labour markets, we introduce the concept of human capital, to explain wage differences between individuals, and explore the role of education. Exploring the Mincer earnings function, discrimination and unemployment, the students will learn how to analyse actual labour data sets using Stata. The first part of the course will deal with linear panel data models and instrumental regressions, the second part will focus on discrete choice models. This course will end with the introduction of non-parametric estimators.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Ability to use Stata to conduct independent micro-econometric analysis and apply advanced micro-economic models.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Exercise (20%) + Written exam (80%)

Further information: Wooldridge, Jeffrey M. (2002), Econometric Analysis of Cross Section and Panel Data, Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. Chapters 10-20.
George J. Borjas, Labor Economics

Time & Venue:
Lecture:
Wednesday, 08:30 to 10:00 in O135, Palace East Wing
Start: 15.02.2017, End: 31.05.2017

Exercise:
Thursday, 12:00 to 13:30 in 158 Poolroom, L 7, 3-5
Start: 23.02.2017, End: 01.06.2017, bi-weekly, class will not take place on 09.03.2017

Non-regular sessions:
Thursday, 16.03.2017, 12:00 to 13:30 in 158 Poolroom, L 7, 3-5

E530 Topics in Industrial Organization (block seminar)


Prof. Nicolas Schutz, Ph.D.

ECTS-Credits: 5
Workload: 150 working hours, containing 21 hours class time and 129 hours independent study time
Prerequisites: For Economics students: E601-603 or E700-703 or equivalent. No prerequisites for MMM students. Not suitable for Business Mathematics students.

Goals and Contents of the module: The seminar will cover selected topics on vertical integration and the boundaries of the firm. A reading list will be communicated at a later stage.

Expected competences acquired after completion of the module: Students will acquire a broad knowledge on topics related to vertical integration, its anticompetitive effects (the double Cournot model à la Salinger (1988), the foreclosure effect à la Ordover, Saloner and Salop (1990), the opportunism problem à la Hart and Tirole (1990)), and its efficiency effects (the transaction costs approach à la Williamson (1978), the property rights approach à la Grossmann-Hart-Moore (1986, 1990)). They should also understand the limitations of these theories, which have been highlighted in the literature (see, among others, Reiffen (1992), McAfee and Schwarz (1993) and Rey and Vergé (2005)). After reading research articles related to these topics, they will acquire an excellent command of the technical tools used by researchers contributing to this field. Relevant techniques include advanced game-theoretical tools (perfect bayesian equilibrium and its refinements, repeated games) as well as mathematical tools (polynomials, multivariate analysis and proof-writing skills). A student who successfully passes this course should use this new knowledge as a starting point to start contributing in a research-oriented way to the vertical integration literature.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Classroom presentation (30% of final grade), Seminar paper report (70% of final grade).

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Monday, 18:00 to 19:30 in 410 Conference room, L 7, 3-5
Start: 13.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Fri+Sat, 09:00 to 18:00 in 410 Conference room, L 7, 3-5
Start: 28.04.2017, End: 29.04.2017

E574 Internet Economics (block seminar)


Chengsi Wang Ph.D. / Prof. Dr. Martin Peitz

ECTS-Credits: 5
Prerequisites: Industrial Organization/ Game Theory.
Organisation meeting17.02.2017

Goals and Contents of the module: The rapid development of Internet provides not only new business models and life styles but also a novel area for economists to explore. In this seminar, students will present research papers on related topics including two-sided market, price dispersion, information congestion, search engine pricing, and so on.

Expected competences acquired after completion of the module: Students should acquire good understanding of business organization on Internet and be able to analysis them using economics models.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Student presentation.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Friday 10:15 to 12:00 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 17.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Friday, 09:00 to 18:00 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 05.05.2017

E576 Economic Modeling - Historical and Methodological Perspectives (block seminar)


Andrej Svorencik

ECTS-Credits: 5
Expected number of students in class: 10
Prerequisites: Economics students: E601, E602, E603 or equivalent; for MMM and Business Mathematics students: good foundations in economic theory

Goals and Contents of the module: During the last two centuries, the way economic science is done has changed radically: it has become a social science based on mathematical models in place of words. The goal of this seminar is to illuminate the nature and the implications of these changes, explain how economists create(d) their models and how they reason with them. The participants can choose a project based on a series of case studies covered in the chapters of Mary Morgan’s widely acclaimed book The World in the Model : How Economists Work and Think (2012). In addition, students will have to delve into the more technical details of the models that are not covered in the book.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: In this seminar, students learn to comprehend, present, critically evaluate and historically situate core economic models. As a result, they should gain knowledge of history of modern economics and better understand the practice of economic modeling.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Presentation (50 minutes, 50%), class participation (Q&A, constructive criticism of other presentations – 10%), seminar paper (40%).

Additional information:
Morgan, Mary S. The World in the Model : How Economists Work and Think [in English]. Cambridge; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2012. (available also online through the university library)
The seminar consists of an introductory lecture and a seminar block where students present their topics.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Monday, 15:30 to 17:00 in 002 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 13.02.2017

Seminar:
Friday, 10:15 to 17:00 in P044 Seminar room, L 7, 3-5
Dates: 07.04.2017 and 05.05.2017

E577 Income and Wealth Inequality (block seminar)


Sebastian Findeisen

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: seminar (2 SWS)
Workload: 150 working hours, containing 21 hours class time and 129 hours independent study time and preparation of the paper and the presentation
Expected number of students in class: 7-20
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent) for all Master's elective courses

Goals and Contents of the module: The rapid and unanticipitated growth of earnings inequality in many developed economies in the last 30 years, most notably in the U.S., U.K and also in germany, has triggered controversial debates. This course deals with the evolution and causes of economic inequality. We start by reviewing the basic facts about the evolution of income and wage ineaquality in the EU and the US in the last decades. We then subsequently discuss the role of technology, education and institutions as determinants of inequality. we draw on many academic papers from the fields of Public Economics, Macroeconomics and Labor Economics.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Understanding of the key facts of income inequality in developed economies. Understanding of the different mechanisms leading to inequality, esp. the role of technology, education as determinants of inequality. Formal understanding of theoretical and empirical approaches to study inequality.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: term paper (60%), presentation (30%), participation (10%).

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Tuesday, 12:00 to 13:30 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 14.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Fri+Sat, 09:00 to 18:00
19.05.2017 in 009, L 9, 1-2 and 20.05.2017 in 003, L 9, 1-2

E586 Evaluation of Labor, Development, Education and Health Programs and Policies (block seminar)


Katja Kaufmann

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: Blockseminar
Workload:
Expected number of students in class: 5-20
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent) for all Master’s elective courses

Goals and Contents of the module:
This course will introduce students to the most important approaches of program evaluation with a particular focus on the application of these methods. These approaches have been widely used in the economics literature in diverse fields (development, labor, public economics, economics of education and health) and can be applied to a wide range of questions such as evaluating the effects of antipoverty programs (e.g. conditional cash transfer programs), educational and job training programs, of changes in laws such as minimum wage laws and minimum drinking age, preventative health care and family planning programs, etc.
The course will be structured according to the most important methods of program evaluation. Each method has been applied in different research areas (i.e. labor, development, education, health and public economics), so students can choose a topic to present and to write a short research paper on from the list of different research areas and of the different possible program evaluation methods.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: The course aims at teaching students the skills that are necessary for reading and understanding recent applications of program evaluation methods in the areas of labor, development, public, education and health economics and for being able to apply the most important approaches of program evaluation to research questions of their interest.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Presentation of a scientific paper in a research area the student is interested in (choice among the papers on an extended version of the reading list below) and writing of a short research paper.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Wednesday, 12:00 to 13:30 in S 031 Seminar room, L 7, 3-5
Start: 15.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Fri+Sat, 09:00 to 18:00 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 21.04.2017, End: 22.04.2017

E598 Financial Time Series (block seminar)


Carsten Jentsch

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: Seminar (2 SWS)
Workload: 150 working hours, containing 21 hours class time and 129 hours independent study time and preparation
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent)

Goals and Contents of the module: The students will work on a topic from financial time series analysis. The main emphasis is on so-called GARCH processes (generalized autoregressive conditional heteroskedastic). This class of models plays an essential role in econometrics for modeling financial time series (Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences 2003 for Robert F. Engle). The seminar topics will refer to mathematical properties of GARCH processes that have to be carved out in the term paper. The seminar is suitable as a basis for a master thesis in theoretical statistics for students from economics and from business mathematics. The maximum number of participants is limited to 14.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: The students have acquired basic knowledge of modelling financial time series, studied their mathematical properties and learned about proof techniques applied frequently in this field of research.
They are capable to understand the corresponding literature for a specific seminar topic and to identify independently relevant references.
Furthermore, they are capable to extract the relevant information from the literature, to summarize it in written form, to give an oral presentation about it and to defend it in a discussion.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Handout, Presentation, Discussion.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Monday, 12:00 to 13:30 in P 043 Seminar room, L 7, 3-5
Start: 13.02.2017 (The organizational meeting will not take place. Prof. Jentsch will directly contact the registered students by e-mail.)

E5005 Seminar in Public Economics - Spring 2017: Tax and Investment Policies in Open Economies (block seminar)


Prof. Eckhard Janeba

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: Seminar (2 SWS)
Workload: Prepatory meeting; intensive reading for and writing of seminar paper; presentation and discussion of papers in block format
Prerequisites: Open to all second and higher semester Master (Economics) students. For all others who wish to participate, please consult with instructor.

Goals and Contents of the module: This seminar is intended for Master students in Economics with interests in public and international economics. The main focus of the seminar is on the role of tax and investment policies in a globalized world. We cover recent research in this area, but also pay close attention to current policy debates and institutional developments. Students must write and present a term paper (possible topics below, own suggestions within the general topic of seminar welcome).

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Students learn to read and understand current research in the area. In contrast to pure lecture-type classes students are highly active in developing the material. Students need to draw on material from previous courses in micro, macro and econometrics to sort the wealth of information and research.
The writing of a term paper allows students to improve their economic writing skills, and to express complex economic phenomena in their own words.
Students present their work in front of the entire course audience. This trains their presentation skills. In addition students need to critically review the material and suggest own ideas for future research. As a result of discussion by all seminar participants students learn to interact with each other and evaluate other students’ work.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Term Paper 50%, Presentation (incl.slides) 40%, Class Participation 10%.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Wednesday, 08:30 to 10:00 in 002 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 15.02.2017

E5006 Topics in Empirical Industrial Organization (block seminar)


Prof. Kathleen Nosal

ECTS-Credits: 6
Teaching method: Block Seminar, Organizational Meeting: February 17, 2017, 3:00-5:00 pm
Workload: 180 work hours, consisting of 24 classroom hours and 156 independent work hours
Prerequisites: E600-E603 (or equivalent).

Goals and Contents of the module: This seminar covers recent empirical research in Industrial Organization. The reading list for the class will focus on a particular industry, such as electricity or healthcare markets . Each student will present a paper chosen from the list to the class and write a report critiquing the paper. Emphasis will be on identifying the central questions addressed in the paper, evaluating the methodology and data, and making suggestions for improvements and extensions.

Expected competences acquired after completion of the module: Students learn to read, present, and critically evaluate recent articles at the frontier of economic research. They will also achieve an understanding of some of the institutions and distinctive features of the industry of interest, with an eye towards identifying potential research questions in this area.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Written report 45%, Presentation 45%, Class participaton and discussion 10%

Time & Venue:
Contact person: Kathleen Nosal, knosal@mail.uni-mannheim.de.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Friday, 14:00 to 15:15 in 002 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 17.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Fri+Sat, 09:00 to 18:00 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 12.05.2017, End: 13.05.2017

E5016 Topics in International Finance (block seminar)


Dr. Roland Beck.

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: Seminar
Expected number of students in class: 15
Prerequisites: E601-E603 (or equivalent)

Goals and Contents of the module: The course reviews selected topics in International Finance with an emphasis on their policy implications. It requires familiarity with basic concepts in international economics and finance, macroeconomics, banking and econometrics. The reading list combines classic academic papers, recent working papers as well as reports by central banks and international organisations. The course is targeted at Master students who are interested in empirical research on international issues or aim at pursuing a career in a large central bank or an international organization (e.g. IMF, BIS, OECD etc.).

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: After completing this module, students will be familiar with selected recent empirical research in international finance which has proven to be relevant for central banks, regulators and international organisations. Students will also get exposed to data sources and empirical strategies used by researchers to identify causal effects in international finance. The seminar will also enable participants to provide constructive criticism of the papers discussed and to put them into a broader context. Finally, the seminar will help students to improve their presentation and writing skills and to get ideas for own empirical research in the area of international economics and finance.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: The evaluation will be based on students’ participation in discussions during the seminar (20%), a presentation of one academic paper from the reading list (40%) and a term paper (40%).

Further information:
1. Financial Development
2. Financial Integration
3. Financial crises
4. Global liquidity and the global financial cycle
5. Global investors
6. The International Monetary System
7. The Global Financial Safety Net.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Thursday, 10:15 to 11:45 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 16.02.2017

E5020 Topics in Empirical Microeconomics (block seminar)


Prof. Dr. Michelle Sovinsky.

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: Block seminar (2 SWS)
Workload: 150 working hours, containing 10 hours class time and 140 hours independent study time and preparation for the exam.
Expected number of students in class: 13
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent) for all Master’s elective courses

Goals and Contents of the module: This course is intended for masters students interested in conducting research in empirical microeconomics. Students will be required to write a paper on a topic in the field and present it during the class.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Students will be familiar with recent research in empirical IO and will be able to provide constructive criticism of work and gain skills in presenting.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Presentation and paper

Additional information: Paper topics will be selected from current publications in empirical microeconomics.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Wednesday, 15:30 to 17:00 in 002 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 15.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Fri+Sat, 09:00 to 18:00 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 26.05.2017, End: 27.05.2017

E5028 Topics on Monetary Union (block seminar)


Antoine Camous

ECTS-Credits: 5
Workload: 150h
Expected number of students in class: 5-20
Prerequisites: E601, E602, and E603 or equivalent. For MMM and Business Mathematics students: good foundations in macroeconomics.

Goals and Contents of the module:
To form a Monetary Union, countries renounce to independent monetary policy and exchange rate adjustments. They adopt a common currency, free capital circulation and centralize monetary policy. Still, substantial elements of economic policy (fiscal policy, labor market regulations, etc.) are kept being conducted at the national level.

This seminar will review theoretical and empirical frontier research to address the following core questions:

1. Why would countries form a Monetary Union?
2. How to design institutions then?
3. How to measure the costs and benefits of a Monetary Union?

The following paper is a starting point for the seminar: Mongelli (2002) – “New Views on the Optimum Currency Area Theory: What is EMU telling us?" - ECB WP 138

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module:
Three interrelated objectives:

1. Review scientific research within its literature, extract its core idea and critically assess the relevance of the idea.
2. Communicate effectively (oral presentation and written reports)
3. Understand and apply the academic peer-review process.

Each participant will be matched with a referee. The objective is to encourage collaborative review of both the content and the clarity of individual reports, and so to improve the presentation of academic research (both written and oral).

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: The final grade will reflect both the content and the clarity of the presentation (30%), the report (40%), and the report refereed (30%).

Further information: The class description can change prior to the start of the seminar.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Wednesday, 17:15 to 18:45 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 15.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Fri+Sat, 09:00 to 18:00 in A001, L 15, 1-6
Start: 05.05.2017, End: 06.05.2017

E5029 Behavioral Finance (block seminar)


Prof. Dr. Holger Rau

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: Block seminar (2 SWS)
Workload: Approx. 150 hours (Organizational meeting, block seminar, preparation of the seminar paper and presentation)
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent) for all Master’s elective courses. Prequisites in Microeconomics and Game Theory.

Goals and Contents of the module: The main focus of the seminar will be the analysis of irrational investor behavior on financial markets. The seminar will deal with several aspects such as psychological approaches, decision heuristics, the impacts of investor sentiments, and neuro economic approaches. The topics are based on 2-3 economic research papers. These papers will serve as main sources. However, the participants have the possibility to extend the literature.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: Students will critically discuss academic research. Moreover, they will acquire the ability to write an academic essay.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: For successful completion of the seminar participants are required to submit a seminar paper (approx. 15 pages) and present it in class (20 minutes). The weighting is 2/3 for the paper and 1/3 for the presentation.

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Wednesday, 12:00 to 13:30 in 002 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 15.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Friday, 10:00 to 18:00 in 003 Seminar room, L 9, 1-2
Start: 19.05.2017

E5032 Competition Policy (block seminar)


Prof. Achim Wambach, Ph.D.

ECTS-Credits: 5
Teaching method: Block seminar (2 SWS)
Workload: Approx. 150 hours (Organizational meeting, block seminar, preparation of the seminar paper and presentation)
Prerequisites: E601-603 (or equivalent)

Goals and Contents of the module: The seminar covers current cases related to modern models of competition theory dealing with different aspects of competition policy (e.g. horizontal mergers, facilitating factors, abuse of dominance, leniency). Each case is connected to a decision by the European Commission (or another competition authority) in a real-life case.

Expected Competences acquired after completion of the module: tudents have gained knowledge in competition theory. They are able to apply their expertise and methods to analyse and evaluate real-life cases concerning competition policy. The students have broadened their analytical abilities as well as their presentation and discussion skills.

Requirements for the assignment of ECTS-Credits and Grades: Seminar participants have to write a seminar paper (22,000 characters including spaces), in which they analyze a problem related to competition policy. The paper has to be presented in class (20 minutes presentation + 10 minutes discussion). The seminar paper and the presentation contribute equally to the final grade. Weight of final grade: Seminar presentation (50%) + report (50%)

Time & Venue:
Organizational meeting:
Friday, 12:15 to 13:45 in P 044 Seminar room, L 7, 3-5
Date: 17.02.2017

Blockseminar:
Fri+Sat, 09:00 to 18:00 in 308, L 9, 7
Start: 05.05.2017, End: 06.05.2017

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